Radagast the Brown

Description:

Radagast was originally a Maia of Yavanna the Fruit-Giver named Aiwendil, meaning “bird-friend”. In Valinor, the land of the Valar, a council was called by Manwë, leader of the Valar, shortly after Sauron’s defeat in the War of the Last Alliance. Though Sauron was overthrown, it would later turn out that he had not been effectively vanquished and his shadow began to fall upon Middle-earth a second time. It was decided to send five emissaries to Middle-earth. These should be “mighty peers of Sauron, yet forgo might, and clothe themselves in flesh,” as they were intended to help Men and Elves unite against Sauron, but the wizards were forbidden from matching the Dark Lord in power and fear.
Radagast was originally a Maia of Yavanna the Fruit-Giver named Aiwendil, meaning “bird-friend”. In Valinor, the land of the Valar, a council was called by Manwë, leader of the Valar, shortly after Sauron’s defeat in the War of the Last Alliance. Though Sauron was overthrown, it would later turn out that he had not been effectively vanquished and his shadow began to fall upon Middle-earth a second time. It was decided to send five emissaries to Middle-earth. These should be “mighty peers of Sauron, yet forgo might, and clothe themselves in flesh,” as they were intended to help Men and Elves unite against Sauron, but the wizards were forbidden from matching the Dark Lord in power and fear.

The other four who were chosen were Gandalf, Saruman, and Alatar and Pallando (the Blue Wizards). Yavanna subsequently begged Curumo to take Aiwendil with him.

Arrival in Middle-earth

Around the year 1000, the Maiar arrived at the Grey Havens in the west of Eriador upon the shores of Middle-earth, having the form of old Men, whom the peoples called Wizards. Curumo arrived first and alone, and Aiwendil arrived at the same time as Olórin.1

Aiwendil, renamed Radagast, meaning “tender of beasts”, by the Ñoldor, protects the great forests. He was little concerned with the affairs of Men and Elves but was far more knowledgeable in plants, birds and beasts in the forest. He also turned away from Saruman during this period, unaware that he despised him and considered him a fool.

Second Age

When the Wizards took their mission they roamed Middle-earth, but Radagast was never much of a traveller.2 There is not much to be told about his early journeys.

Third Age

In The Hobbit, Gandalf says that Radagast is his cousin,3 though this more likely refers to their friendship or the fact that they are both Wizards, and not actual close kinship, except in that they are both Maiar.4

By the late Third Age he eventually settled down and dwelt, for a time at least, at Rhosgobel somewhere between the Carrock and the Old Forest Road.1 Situated on the western borders of Mirkwood, it can be assumed that the Wizard held watch against the Shadow of Dol Guldur that slowly engulfed the forest. It is likely that he became acquainted with the inhabitants of that region. Close to animals and birds, he was friends with the Great Eagles.2 Although the neighboring Beorn was unsociable, he used to see him from time to time, and he considered Radagast “not bad” for a Wizard.
The other four who were chosen were Gandalf, Saruman, and Alatar and Pallando (the Blue Wizards). Yavanna subsequently begged Curumo to take Aiwendil with him.
Radagast was originally a Maia of Yavanna the Fruit-Giver named Aiwendil, meaning “bird-friend”. In Valinor, the land of the Valar, a council was called by Manwë, leader of the Valar, shortly after Sauron’s defeat in the War of the Last Alliance. Though Sauron was overthrown, it would later turn out that he had not been effectively vanquished and his shadow began to fall upon Middle-earth a second time. It was decided to send five emissaries to Middle-earth. These should be “mighty peers of Sauron, yet forgo might, and clothe themselves in flesh,” as they were intended to help Men and Elves unite against Sauron, but the wizards were forbidden from matching the Dark Lord in power and fear.

The other four who were chosen were Gandalf, Saruman, and Alatar and Pallando (the Blue Wizards). Yavanna subsequently begged Curumo to take Aiwendil with him.

Arrival in Middle-earth

Around the year 1000, the Maiar arrived at the Grey Havens in the west of Eriador upon the shores of Middle-earth, having the form of old Men, whom the peoples called Wizards. Curumo arrived first and alone, and Aiwendil arrived at the same time as Olórin.1

Aiwendil, renamed Radagast, meaning “tender of beasts”, by the Ñoldor, protects the great forests. He was little concerned with the affairs of Men and Elves but was far more knowledgeable in plants, birds and beasts in the forest. He also turned away from Saruman during this period, unaware that he despised him and considered him a fool.

Second Age

When the Wizards took their mission they roamed Middle-earth, but Radagast was never much of a traveller.2 There is not much to be told about his early journeys.

Third Age

In The Hobbit, Gandalf says that Radagast is his cousin,3 though this more likely refers to their friendship or the fact that they are both Wizards, and not actual close kinship, except in that they are both Maiar.4

By the late Third Age he eventually settled down and dwelt, for a time at least, at Rhosgobel somewhere between the Carrock and the Old Forest Road.1 Situated on the western borders of Mirkwood, it can be assumed that the Wizard held watch against the Shadow of Dol Guldur that slowly engulfed the forest. It is likely that he became acquainted with the inhabitants of that region. Close to animals and birds, he was friends with the Great Eagles.2 Although the neighboring Beorn was unsociable, he used to see him from time to time, and he considered Radagast “not bad” for a Wizard.

Arrival in Middle-earthEdit
Around the year 1000, the Maiar arrived at the Grey Havens in the west of Eriador upon the shores of Middle-earth, having the form of old Men, whom the peoples called Wizards. Curumo arrived first and alone, and Aiwendil arrived at the same time as Olórin.1

Aiwendil, renamed Radagast, meaning “tender of beasts”, by the Ñoldor, protects the great forests. He was little concerned with the affairs of Men and Elves but was far more knowledgeable in plants, birds and beasts in the forest. He also turned away from Saruman during this period, unaware that he despised him and considered him a fool.

Second AgeEdit
When the Wizards took their mission they roamed Middle-earth, but Radagast was never much of a traveller.2 There is not much to be told about his early journeys.

Third Age

In The Hobbit, Gandalf says that Radagast is his cousin,3 though this more likely refers to their friendship or the fact that they are both Wizards, and not actual close kinship, except in that they are both Maiar.4

By the late Third Age he eventually settled down and dwelt, for a time at least, at Rhosgobel somewhere between the Carrock and the Old Forest Road.1 Situated on the western borders of Mirkwood, it can be assumed that the Wizard held watch against the Shadow of Dol Guldur that slowly engulfed the forest. It is likely that he became acquainted with the inhabitants of that region. Close to animals and birds, he was friends with the Great Eagles.2 Although the neighboring Beorn was unsociable, he used to see him from time to time, and he considered Radagast “not bad” for a Wizard.

In 2950 Radagast asked the Company of the Whiskey Drinking Bear for air accompanying him to Dol Guldur. He witnessed the horrors of Tyrant’s Hill, fought his way through Fenbridge Castle and discovered evidence of treachery in King Thranduil’s Court.

Bio:

Radagast the Brown

The Company of the Whiskey Drinking Bear d20threatdetected d20threatdetected